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Are Dental Veneers Right for You?

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Are you happy with your smile? Many people don't like the way their front teeth look. They might think that they're too small, not quite straight, or not white enough. While bonding, braces, and whitening can solve some of these issues, dental veneers are a popular way to get your front teeth looking the way you want them to. Not sure if veneers are right for you? Read on to find out more about what they are, how they can change your appearance, and what might cause them not to be a good choice for some people. What Are Dental Veneers? Dental veneers are very thin shells of material that are bonded to the front of your teeth. They sit on the tooth much like an artificial nail tip sits on your natural fingernail. Because the...

What You Should Know About Baby Teeth

Whether you've recently had a baby or your youngest child is under the age of 12 or 13, it's likely that you are dealing with (or about to deal with) baby teeth. Also called deciduous teeth, this is the set of teeth your child will have until its replaced, little by little, with his or her adult teeth. Here are some frequently asked questions about baby teeth, along with their answers. When Do Baby Teeth Erupt? Your baby was probably born without any teeth, though this is not always the case. Usually, little teeth begin erupting around six months of age, beginning with the two central incisors on the bottom. Slowly, the rest of the teeth will come in, with the canine incisors on top coming in after the bicuspids behind them. By the time your child is three, all of his or her baby teeth, 20 in all, will probably have...

Dental Safety: Keep Your Teeth Safe While Swimming

One of the delights of summer is swimming. Whether you go for a dip in the lake, the ocean, or the swimming pool, the water is refreshing and a fun place to spend the day. You might not think much about dental safety when it comes to swimming, but your teeth might be at risk of injury. Read on to find out how to keep your teeth safe while enjoying the water this summer. No Running This is more of a concern for children, who should also be taught not to run at the pool or the dock. It's also a concern for adult, though, particularly those who might be distracted, wearing flip-flops, or carrying sunscreen, pool toys, and towels. Be careful on the pool deck, which might become slippery once people have gotten in and out of pool a few...

Are Your Work Habits Hurting Your Teeth?

Work: You spend roughly 40 hours per week there, and you probably don't give much thought to how your workplace impacts your dental health. You might be surprised to learn that your work habits could be hurting your teeth. Take a look at this list of ways that what you do at work could impact your dental health, as well as tips for turning your situation around. You Are Too Stressed Out Life is stressful, and many people find that work is a large part of the stress. When you are stressed, you might grind and clench your teeth. This can lead to hypersensitivity, worn enamel, damaged fillings, and even loose teeth. If you have a stressful job, take steps to relax and cope with whatever is going on. Your teeth will thank you, and so will your heart. In addition, talk...

Mouthwash: Do You Need It?

You already know that you should brush and floss your teeth regularly in order to keep them healthy and strong. Did you know that mouthwash might also be an important part of your dental hygiene regimen? On the other hand, sometimes it's not the right choice for a particular person to use. The best way to determine whether you should be using mouthwash is to ask your dentist for personalized advice. You can also read on for information about different types of mouthwash and when they might be right -- or wrong -- for you. Antiseptic Mouthwashes One popular brand name of antiseptic mouthwashes is Listerine. Most stores have a generic version as well, which often costs less money and has the same ingredients. In addition to these over-the-counter mouthwashes, your dentist can prescribe a stronger antiseptic mouthwash if you need...

Cold Sores and Canker Sores: What’s the Difference?

Cold sores and canker sores are both nuisances, and both cause sores in or around the mouth. Many patients confuse the two and are not sure whether they're dealing with a cold sore or a canker sore when they experience an uncomfortable lesion. Here are some tips on differentiating between the two, what you can do about them, and when to see a dentist for help. Cold Sores Cold sores are sometimes called fever blisters, and they occur on the outside of the mouth, on or around the lips. They're caused by a contagious herpes virus, and once you have the virus in your system, it remains there, dormant. At times of stress, illness, or just because, one or more cold sores can erupt. People can get the virus through kissing or sharing utensils. Most adults have been exposed to the...

Medications and Your Oral Health

6451575117_49b9673c64_zDo you take prescription or over-the-counter medication for any health issues? You probably already know that any medicine can cause unwanted side effects. Your doctor has prescribed the medication you're taking because the benefits outweigh the risks. Sometimes, however, the side effects can be uncomfortable or affect other parts of your body. If your medication is causing oral health symptoms, don't stop taking it; instead, talk to your doctor about ways to reduce the side effects. In some cases, it might be possible to switch to another medication, but this is something your doctor will need to decide. In the meantime, here are some ways that medications can affect your oral health, as well as suggestions on how to handle it. Dry Mouth One common side effect of many different medications is a dry mouth. If you're only taking the medication...

Dental Care for Seniors

1663269727_471a74b122_zAs you age, you have different medical needs. Dental care is no exception. Those in their senior years often have conditions that can affect their dental health. If you have questions or concerns about your teeth and gums, you should see your dentist, who knows your individual circumstances. In the meantime, here are some ways that your dental care might change as you get older. Medications Can Affect Your Oral Health If you are on medication for your heart, diabetes, or other health conditions, they can sometimes affect your teeth and gums. One common side effect of many different medications is a dry mouth. Having a dry mouth is not only uncomfortable, but also contributes to dental decay. Saliva washes away bacteria and plaque, and not having enough of it can lead to cavities and gum disease. If you are on...